An Integrated Approach – Young St by Tom Mark Henry
Annandale, NSW, Australia

Photography Damian Bennett
Architecture Tom Mark Henry
Words Jackson Hides

With an approach that integrates the functional and the aesthetic, a run-down, one-bedroom terrace in a heritage conservation area has been transformed by Tom Mark Henry into a tranquil and light-filled home for a young family.

Owing to an outdated floorplan, the entire ground floor was gutted, keeping only the façade, whilst a second storey was added. This provided flexibility in how to approach the space, seeing two more bedrooms and a second bathroom gained, as well as dramatically improving light access. Sitting on a site only 3.8 metres wide, however, meant that space remained at a premium. As a result, novel approaches to functional elements within the house led to some of the most significant design elements on the property. This is perhaps best illustrated by the stair balustrade. Dissatisfied with available glass options, Tom Mark Henry instead proposed and developed 10mm powdercoated steel balustrade with concealed fixings in consultation with a local metal manufacturer.

The steel balustrade and skylights throughout are examples of some of the considered details in this project.

Passive solar design principles were consciously explored throughout the project. As abundant natural light was high on the briefing agenda, some seven skylights were strategically placed throughout the living space, kitchen and stair void. With the east-facing windows that capture light in the morning and the north facing windows on the first floor that are optimally positioned for solar access throughout the day, the interior is bathed in a wash of beautiful and soothing natural light.

A run-down, one-bedroom terrace in a heritage conservation area has been transformed by Tom Mark Henry.

Air conditioning was passed over in favour of double-glazed external windows and doors, which also assist with noise pollution caused by the neighbourhood and living beneath a flight path. The double-glazed windows also allowed the clients to avoid installing ducted air conditioning. Instead, a concrete slab on the ground floor assists with heating in the cooler months, whilst ceiling fans ensure ample circulation in summer.

A neutral palette was favoured throughout so as to allow depth through texture and materiality, ably complementing the abundant natural light.

The neutral palette allows depth to be achieved through textures, such as natural clay rendered walls and limestone bench tops, and materials such as terrazzo and marble in the bathrooms. In addition to their aesthetic contribution, the clay rendered walls also contribute functionally to the house’s natural climactic regulation by adjusting the humidity in the air, exemplifying how the visual and pragmatic combined on this project.

Passive solar design principles were consciously explored throughout the project.

Through innovative approaches to the design brief, Tom Mark Henry has allowed Young St to transform from a dated and irrelevant terrace into a calming, minimalist space, with a practical sensibility and emphasis on sustainability at its core.

Tom Mark Henry has allowed Young St to transform from a dated and irrelevant terrace into a calming, minimalist space.

Young St By Tom Mark Henry Annandale Nsw Australia Image 17
Published 11 July, 2020
Photography  Damian Bennett
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