Inspired by Modernism – Brighton 6 by Pleysier Perkins and InForm Design
Brighton, VIC, Australia

Photography Derek Swalwell
Words Thida Sachathep

Making the most of the Australian summer, Brighton 6 by Pleysier Perkins and InForm sits on a corner site and is brought to life by subtle injections of greenery.

From the very early stages, it was obvious that the clients had an affinity for mid-century modern pavilions. The typology boasts light-filled spaces that engage the landscape, which project architect Ross Berger achieves with Brighton 6. Creating intimate spaces for reflection and quiet, the project not only connects with its surrounds but also reflects the client’s lifestyle.

The home revolves around living zones, where sliding doors open to a garden and pool area.

Ensuring that design celebrates the landscape, it was crucial for architects to consider the interior and exterior spaces as one. “Consideration was given as to how [interior] areas relate to various aspects of the garden with the shadows created by vegetation on the exterior walls, encouraging an interplay of home and garden,” Ross explains. To assist with growing vegetation, timber pergolas and delicate steel adjustable venetians were installed, creating a movement that intertwines the built environment with the natural one.

The breakfast bar and custom sunken lounge boast a timeless material palette, ideal for a vibrant young family.

The strong connection between the upper levels and lower landscape is strengthened by locally-sourced materials, such as the rough sawn face of the blackbutt timber cladding. “A dry creek bed weaves through the landscape and decking that bridges over this and into a framed courtyard where the roofing is covered with scattered river pebbles,” says Ross.

From the very early stages, it was obvious that the clients had an affinity for mid-century modern pavilions.

The floor plan was designed to meet family needs, with a strong consideration in ensuring that the interior spaces are flexible to afford multiple uses. Changing floor and ceiling heights, as well as materiality and outlooks to the outdoors allowed design to achieve multiple spaces of seclusion and intimacy. The music room, for example, is located to the side of the main living space – a few steps away from the garden. Darker timbers balance the reduction of natural light, while the concrete floor grounds the space with the garden beds outside. Meanwhile, curved detail motifs contrast with the straight lines utilised to create the overarching rectilinear volume of the house.

Strong vertical and rectilinear lines juxtapose with curved motifs and the natural landscape.

Native flora and coastal bushland, particularly the moonahs and tea-trees, inspired the material palette. The use of neutral tones and various textures reinforces the client’s appreciation for adventure and nature. Horizontal timber boards and vertical battens work harmoniously to create strong lines that gently juxtapose with the natural curves of the landscape. The house and site will continue to mature over time as the garden develops and the house softens and weathers.

Rough sawn timber cladding encircles the exterior of Brighton 6, meeting layers of brickwork, timber and luscious greenery.

Layering many elements that reflect both the natural landscape and the client’s love of mid-century modernism, Brighton 6 embodies a lightness that evokes a sense of joy in every space.

The typology boasts light-filled spaces that engage the landscape, which project architect Ross Berger achieves with Brighton 6.

Brighton 6 embodies a lightness that evokes a sense of joy in every space.

Published 11 February, 2020
Photography  Derek Swalwell
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