Lasting Resonance – Chloe by Templeton Architecture
Malvern East, VIC, Australia

Photography Ben Hosking
Interior Design Templeton Architecture
Words Bronwyn Marshall

As a regenerative process, Chloe takes inspiration from its name, hinting at a newness and growth, when expanding on the previous Federation-era home. Templeton Architecture extends the dialogue between building and site, stretching the existing volume outward to create a meaningful engagement with the landscape through curated openings of the added pavilion.

In amongst homes of the same vintage, Chloe sits comfortably in its Malvern East milieu as a prominent and important contributor to the area’s rich architectural history. On its generous allotment, the primary intent was to extend the original footprint, restoring the pre-existing home and creating a series of meaningful and deliberate connections with the rear garden and entertaining spaces. Inspired by its name which means ‘new growth’, the focus is on an evolutionary and regenerative process, acknowledging that the original home harvests the proposed. To the rear and south sits the new pavilion, which then playfully engages with the exterior platforms that taper down to the rear landscaped areas, acting as key extensions of the built home. Templeton Architecture conjures a respectful approach, delicately expanding and revitalising the original and, in the process, creates a home of lasting resonance.

The location and siting of the pavilion embraces the available natural light, which was previously not oriented to the north. The capture of natural light allows a passive illumination and natural comfort internally.

With landscapes by Ben Scott Garden Design, Chloe is built by Harvest Building Company. Core to the restoration and expansion was a focus on live ability and the injection of family-focused values. In creating a relevant home that spoke to contemporary sensibilities, the idea of a completely open-planned living arrangement was rejected to make way for a purposely detached dining space as a destination in itself. While the kitchen flows through to the living space, they are also their own spaces, all connected visually to one another and the garden. The location and siting of the pavilion embraces the available natural light, which was previously not oriented to the north. The capture of natural light allows a passive illumination and natural comfort internally.

A double height void element allows a sense of separation between the old and the new, while allowing a celebration of the original home’s detailing. The relief element allows the ornateness of the original roof to become a focal point as part of the transition, while also allowing natural light deeper into the home. Repeated geometries such as the arch and circular windows are brought from the old into the new, connecting the two eras, and reinterpreted in a cleaner and more modern way. The crisply defined openings then offer framed apertures to the garden and the mature jacaranda trees.

Templeton Architecture conjures a respectful approach, delicately expanding and revitalising the original and, in the process, creates a home of lasting resonance.

Chloe beautifully creates a relevant bridge between the original home and its contemporary pavilion addition. Templeton Architecture has applied grace and restraint in creating a modern home that captures a ‘present-ness’, while being individualised to suit its family and how they uniquely want to live.

Chloe By Templeton Architecture – Project Feature – The Local Project Image 03
Published 13 April, 2021
Photography  Ben Hosking
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