Revisiting the Unrealised – St Vincent’s Place by Coy Yiontis
Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Photography Peter Clarke
Words Bronwyn Marshall

Revisiting a previous project, St Vincent’s Place sees the realisation of original planning and detailing that was never fulfilled. Coy Yiontis reconfigures and reinstates the original vision through a minimalist lens for the new owner.

Located in one of Melbourne’s most heritage-rich areas, the original vision for St Vincent’s Place overcame significant planning opposition in regard to heritage to create a contemporary counterpart to its storied neighbours. Since their original involvement in 2010, Coy Yiontis was again engaged to both fully realise their intent for the site in renovating the interiors and extending the home. Originally commissioned by the new owners to assist in works to house their classic car collection, the relationship expanded along with the scope of the project. As a response to the differing needs of its new owners, and in order to speak to a fully realised home both inside and out, the team came back to site, interpreting it through a refined minimal and classic lens.

Most notable was the reinstatement of the light shafts throughout, welcoming in natural light and creating elements of drama and ambience.

As a result of this re-engagement with the project, Coy Yiontis was able to fulfil the original design intent and detailing, which had been deviated from in the initial construction as a result of the architects’ non-involvement in the building process. Most notable was the reinstatement of the light shafts throughout, welcoming in natural light and creating elements of drama and ambience. This key feature, as a highlight of the original design, allows a unique engagement with the interior materiality and cladding, particularly the natural veining of the marble. The liberation and expansive use of such a strong and iconic finish throughout both ties the interiors to a single vision and strengthens the project’s ambitions as a timeless and contemporary addition to its streetscape.

Dotted with pockets of Japanese-inspired landscape throughout, St Vincent’s Place prioritises a sense of considered minimalism and longevity in the extension works.

Dotted with pockets of Japanese-inspired landscape throughout, St Vincent’s Place prioritises a sense of considered minimalism and longevity in the extension works. The re-establishment of the atmospheric natural light elements, together with planning that both encourages and engages with the interaction between the home and its surroundings, the resulting new works bring the home a strength of purpose. Clean lines come together with warm and muted timber elements, and European oak joinery and flooring meets the careful detailing of junctions. The resulting home, where the relationship between inside and out is enhanced by continuous material application across thresholds, creates an aesthetic that binds all its elements with restraint.

Since their original involvement in 2010, Coy Yiontis was again engaged to both fully realise their intent for the site in renovating the interiors and extending the home.

Dotted with pockets of Japanese-inspired landscape throughout, St Vincent’s Place prioritises a sense of considered minimalism and longevity in the extension works.

The resulting home, where the relationship between inside and out is enhanced by continuous material application across thresholds, creates an aesthetic that binds all of its elements with restraint.

St Vincent’s Place is defined by its sophistication through careful and considered detailing, intentionally restrained palette and the sense of refinement to its comprising parts. This beautiful project has allowed Coy Yiontis to realise their original vision (albeit with two clients over many years) and bring this approach together with an enhanced sophistication and understanding of the site. The resulting home engages its site, is monumental in its bold and expansive use of such beautiful natural materials and provides its owners a timeless and iconic contemporary home.

Published 13 January, 2020
Photography  Peter Clarke
Top
This website uses cookies to improve your browsing experience. Please accept to continue. Accept Cookies