An Eco-Home for an Artist - Yandoit Cabin by Adam Kane Architects

Words by Emma-Kate Wilson
Adam Kane Architects Local Australian Architecture And Design

Adam Kane Architects designed Yandoit Cabin as an eco-home for an artist to live and work within the surrounding gumtrees.

Situated in north-west of Melbourne, the house is tucked into the bushland and carefully composed of a series of grids. Yandoit Cabin locks these together with low-maintenance materials to create a form that works with the surrounding environment. Crucial to the build were self-sustainable factors allowing for off-grid living and minimal impact on the site.

Eco Friendly Home For An Artist

The materiality of the external cladding is accentuated by the simplicity of the form, while the burnt umber tones of the building complement the natural palette of the surrounding bush. The metal cladding reflects and absorbs the light and patterns of the sky, enhancing the aesthetics of the cabin. The result is a building in constant flux – with revolving reflections of the transition from day to night, the home becomes a piece of sculpture accentuating its environment.

Situated in north-west of Melbourne, the house is tucked into the bushland and carefully composed of a series of grids.

The sculptural qualities continue with the asymmetrical shape, that sees the cabin sit sympathetically yet confidently within the gum trees. The south side of the building is dominated by a block of concrete that begins to format the space, with the block visually grounding the house and giving strength to the metal façade. Functionally, this concrete mass acts as the entrance to the house, and creates a separate area concealing the bathroom and private courtyard.

The bathroom is entirely open to a private, internal courtyard and, thanks to its protection from extreme weather conditions, now outlooks onto an established fernery.

In the living area, the grids of white-washed plywood can be opened to reveal the kitchen, laundry, and storage. The clever use of timber concealment ensures the space is clutter-free, creating a peaceful environment allowing the artist to reflect on the environment just outside. The minimal interventions are highlighted by concrete walls, floors, and sharp black steel accents.

Bespoke Custom Timber Design And Architecture
The architects used materials and techniques to allow the home to be modest and unfussy, hiding areas when not in use – such as the kitchen or laundry.
Off The Grid Residential Design
Each piece of sliding plywood panels connects in an upward fashion, drawing the eye to the centrepiece of the home.

While the project is to an extent closed off from the external landscape, with only a select few openings, it is strongly connected with nature. A skylight dominates the centre of the internal irregular forms, as the angles of the ceiling converge towards light that rushes inwards. A bedroom in the mezzanine sits below the asymmetrical roofline, accentuating the height of the interior living space. Contrasted with the sense of enclosure and protection, the beam of sun from the skylight becomes an intense beacon providing connection with the outside world, while the strategically positioned windows frame views of the bush outside.

The minimal interventions are highlighted by concrete walls, floors, and sharp black steel accents.

The orientation of the cabin ensures passive solar heating and cross ventilation are maximised, taking advantage of sunlight for heat and lighting. The use of concrete floors and walls generates thermal mass, meaning only a wood-burning fireplace is needed to heat the home. With the design ensuring the home functions sustainably off-grid, durable minimalist materials prevent the demand of constant upkeep in the wild weather conditions.

Minimal of impact yet remarkable in effect, the Yandoit Cabin is a sculptural reminder of the beauty of the natural world and to need to preserve it.

We Visit The Off Grid Yandoit Cabin From Adam Kane Architects Which Is Tucked Away In The Gumtrees
The angles and reflective metal cladding allow the artist’s home and studio to appear as a piece of art perched on the hilltop.