The Local Project Publication
Issue Nº6
June 2021
Issue Nº6 features 19 projects, including new work from Patterson Associates, Studio Bright, Pandolfini Architects, Polly Harbison Design, Eastop Architects, Allied_Office, Archier, and more. This issue also includes profiles of Yasmine Saleh Ghoniem of YSG, design advocate and performer Tim Ross, Madeleine Blanchfield of Madeleine Blanchfield Architects, visual artist Ash Keating, Katie Lockhart of Katie Lockhart Studio, and many others.
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Issue Nº6 features 19 projects, including new work from Patterson Associates, Studio Bright, Pandolfini Architects, Polly Harbison Design, Eastop Architects, Allied_Office, Archier, and more. This issue also includes profiles of Yasmine Saleh Ghoniem of YSG, design advocate and performer Tim Ross, Madeleine Blanchfield of Madeleine Blanchfield Architects, visual artist Ash Keating, Katie Lockhart of Katie Lockhart Studio, and many others.
$29.50 + SHIPPING
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Inside

POUAKA WAIKURA — PATTERSON ASSOCIATES

Aligning as a considered sequence of nomadic forms sculpting its own rural street, Pouaka Waikura sits anchored to its site, extending a vernacular familiar and resonant to its owners. Taking a unique approach to a beguiling site, Patterson Associates’ deliberately simplified methodology creates an intuitive connection to place.

PEARL BEACH HOUSE — POLLY HARBISON DESIGN

A small clearing in the bushland around Pearl Beach provides a reprieve from the density of the vegetation that obscures the sky above. Within this clearing, Polly Harbison Design has placed a building whose monumental qualities echo the scale of the surrounding forest and are representative of the recent marked shift in the relationship between architecture and such bushfire-prone environments.

CORNER HOUSE — ARCHIER

Corner House by Archier is situated on a challenging square site in Flinders, on the lands of the Bunurong people. Despite its proximity to the picturesque coastline of the Mornington Peninsula, the project’s more immediate context called for a carefully considered strategy that could limit the house’s exposure to the adjacent streets. Responding confidently to this challenge, Corner House deploys a restrained, dark façade to the perimeter of the site that captures and conceals a delicate private courtyard within its walls.

8 YARD HOUSE — STUDIO BRIGHT

8 Yard House – so named for its eight functionally distinguished outdoor spaces – upholds the premise that enduring and responsive homes are unified by an alliance with and an intrinsic connection to the natural world. Designed by Studio Bright, the home has been realised through a series of gestures towards streetscape, orientation, interior navigation for a large family, and an overarching thoughtfulness for current and future needs both inside and out.

SOUTH MELBOURNE HOUSE — PANDOLFINI ARCHITECTS

Unfolding beyond the modest façade of a heritage-listed Victorian terrace, South Melbourne House’s lofty aspirations are articulated in the unexpected drama of its spaces. As the home of Pandolfini Architects’ Dominic Pandolfini, the studio’s long-held interest in striking forms and the juxtaposition of materials celebrates the distinction between old and new, while balancing experimental details and nuanced gestures.

MARATHON HOUSE — NEIL ARCHITECTURE

Marathon House is a thoughtful addition to an Italianate Victorian house in Hawthorn East – a characterful yet compact home extended to meet the demands of contemporary family living

CHENIER — EASTOP ARCHITECTS

Presenting on approach as a dark box-like form, Chenier is a shadowy, enigmatic presence that seems almost conscientiously apart from the site it hovers above. But the series of rendered blade walls that sit adjacent to and are glimpsed beyond this volume hint to the complex relationship between building and landscape that Eastop Architects has orchestrated, not breaking down the distinction but rather interpolating the two to extend and intensify the experience of both.

BLACKWATTLE — ALLIED_OFFICE

Blackwattle is the built manifestation of its owners’ socialist-leaning and gently pragmatic ideals. It is a home realised out of thoughtful consideration for both its century-long past and a future-focused relevance. These intents, intricately woven into the definition of sustainability, have been channelled into an elegant resurrection intended to endure for another 100 years.

Sand Castle — Luigi Rosselli Architects, Raffaello Rosselli Architect and Alwill Interiors

With Sand Castle, Luigi Rosselli Architects, Raffaello Rosselli Architect and Alwill Interiors unite to produce a shimmering statement on codes of humanism as well as a poetic exploration of materiality and site.

Blairgowrie — Watts Studio

A close collaboration between Powell & Glenn Architects, Watts Studio and Ian Barker Gardens, Blairgowrie House has a strong sense of place and purpose. With raw and textured natural materials, tones inspired by the coast and vegetation, and an eclectic landscape of native plantings, this home belongs to and amplifies its context to induce a holiday state of mind.

Deepdene Residence — Freadman White

Freadman White believes in designing with empathy, and one need only explore the studio’s work to find proof of this ethos translating into the built form. With an innate ability to respond evocatively to briefing and site requirements, deliberate and hidden gestures permeate Freadman White’s projects, creating moments of intimacy and celebration informed by context. In many ways, Deepdene Residence exemplifies this approach, illustrating the architects’ understanding of how place and form are inextricably linked.

Carlotta — Matthew Woodward and Esoteriko

Driven by a clear vision and strong collaboration, Carlotta Residence in Double Bay, Sydney, reflects the clients’ personalities and captures the urban feel of the cities they have previously lived in. Raw and exposed materials played a dominant role in the brief, with Matthew Woodward Architecture using concrete, steel and American black walnut and Esoteriko imbuing spaces with comfort and warmth.
AND MORE
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